the child whisperer

When we heard about Carol Tuttle’s book The Child Whispererwe were intrigued!The basis for the book is that every child expresses one (or more!) of four general patterns in their body language, behavior and personality. They’re what Tuttle calls the “Four Types.” The idea is that if you honor your child for who they are the most core level they will be happier, more cooperative, and you will need to discipline them less. We’re listening, Carol!

To help illustrate these types, Carol has come up with four Spring activities to do with your kids based on their “type.” Each of our kids seems to fit into one main type with a 1-2 sub types as well. While we never feel that labeling or pigeon-holing children is productive, (they go through phases as fast as undies in potty-training season!) we love that Carol has taken very basic, very intrinsic qualities and defined how to best parent and communicate based on their needs. Children are so unique and wildly different from one another, parents of multiple children can attest, it’s a nice reminder to really learn how to honor them for what makes them so special and unique to us.

Also, we’re giving away five bundles of The Child Whisperer (the book, audio tapes and e-book) on Facebook, just share today’s status about this post with your Facebook friends to enter!

Okay, now for the activities! First, up TYPE 1:

self help, parenting, kids, therapy, child whisperer

The Fun-loving “Type 1″ Child

Socially oriented to the world, these children move through life with a bounce. They love activities with surprises, imagination, and people. Some ideas:

  • No-Reason Party: Throw a party for no reason! Doesn’t have to be elaborate—it just needs friends. Even better if it’s a surprise.
  • Surprise Drive: Let your child tell you where to turn the car. Who knows where you’ll end up!
  • Say Yes: These children have endless ideas. Say yes to one that you normally wouldn’t.

self help, parenting, kids, therapy, child whispererThe Sensitive “Type 2″ Child

Emotionally oriented, these children are gentle and mindful in nature. Naturally quieter, they enjoy activities to unwind or feel comfortable.

  • Read-a-thon: Prepare a comfy space, stock up on books and snacks, and your child is in heaven!
  • Game Plan: These kids LOVE to plan—let them plan a family meal or outing.
  • Best Friend: These children relate best one-on-one. Invite over one friend.

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The Determined “Type 3″ Child

Physically oriented, these children move fast and are SO determined. They enjoy competitive activities where they can get their hands dirty.

  • Race Day: Hold an informal race at the park, or sign up for a 5k. These children love the push of competition.
  • Build Up: They love projects—let them build something.
  • Open for Business: Natural entrepreneurs, these children love earning extra money, whether through a lemonade stand or jobs around the house.

self help, parenting, kids, therapy, child whisperer

The More Serious “Type 4″ Child

Intellectually oriented, these children have an analytical, perfecting nature. They like activities that allow them to focus on a single mental track. Some ideas:

  • Alone Time: Without down-time, these kids get cranky. Give them space.
  • Picture Perfect: Let them color perfectly, make a recipe perfectly, or put something together perfectly. Let your child decide what perfect looks like.
  • Just Ask: These kids see themselves as their own authorities. If you want to plan the perfect activity for them, ask what they want to do!


For more in depth discussion about types, customized parenting tips, and discipline, check out The Child Whisperer!

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Comments

  1. on April 8, 2013 at 8:53 am said:

    Sounds like a great read! Specially for mummy’s to be :)

  2. Mae:
    on April 8, 2013 at 9:13 am said:

    I will have to ask my local library if they’ll be carrying this book. Or if I can buy it& donate it when i’m done. I’m always looking for ways to better understand and parent my children (who have two VERY different personalities!!) Thanks for sharing!

    Mae

    • Small Fry:
      on April 8, 2013 at 10:58 am said:

      Share on Facebook and we’ll put a good word in for you to win it ;)

  3. Kayla:
    on April 8, 2013 at 9:37 am said:

    Thanks for sharing, i want to read that book! I have a type 1 and a type 3 over here. Things be cray cray at my house! How nice it would be sometimes to have one who liked alone time and a pile of books! Haha.

    • Small Fry:
      on April 8, 2013 at 10:58 am said:

      Haha, so true!

  4. teresa t:
    on April 8, 2013 at 9:46 am said:

    I shared in FB . Interesting…what age do they indicate they used for forming they types?

    • on April 8, 2013 at 11:11 am said:

      Hi Teresa T, good question! One we get a lot! Since the 4 Types are based on movement you can actually tell once you start to feel your baby move in your tummy! For the moms of many kids I’m sure they can tell you how different each child moved in the tummy. My baby is 11 months old and I suspected she was a Type 3 while in the womb – swift, determined movement and kicks. And sure enough once she was born it I knew she was a Type 3 determined baby. It has been so supportive knowing she is a Type 3 even in her first year of life! I know what to expect from her better and I have the tools to best support her in expressing and living true to herself!

      • on April 8, 2013 at 5:59 pm said:

        My amazing four year old didn’t grow in my tummy. However, we brought her home from the hospital and I could tell within a month what kind of personality she had. However, a lot of moms whose babies didn’t grow in their tummy and whose child had to work through some degree of trauma due to relinquishment or attachment disorder might have an interesting take on how they eventually figured out what personality type their child had and/or how it changed. There’s a lot you can say in regards to nature vs. nurture when it comes to personality types in adopted kiddos. Might be an interesting angle for a post for you in the future. I know I can see so much nurture in my girl’s personality even though we have a great relationship with her birth mom and there’s some innate nature there as well.

  5. on April 8, 2013 at 9:56 am said:

    This is so interesting ! I was just thinking yesterday about my children’s personalities and really how I can parent each one better to them. This was a great lil reminder and ideas! Thanks guys!

    • Small Fry:
      on April 8, 2013 at 10:57 am said:

      It takes a lot of purpose and intention to parent that way, but it’s worth it, isn’t it? We need lots of reminders over here.

  6. on April 8, 2013 at 10:16 am said:

    I have heard buzz about this book – such an interesting point of view. I think this will be on my summer reading list. Definitely see a little of all these types in my lil but she favors #3 the most. :)

    brandy j | http://www.prettyplainjanes.com

    • Small Fry:
      on April 8, 2013 at 10:57 am said:

      Let us know how you like it!

  7. Jen Sanders:
    on April 8, 2013 at 2:05 pm said:

    I just learned my type through Carol’s “Dressing Your Truth” program. I am now learning my children’s types, I have six (SIX!) and I cannot tell you how this has transformed our family dynamic! Finally! A true handbook for parents!

  8. on April 8, 2013 at 3:27 pm said:

    I have been looking for a parenting book. This sounds perfect! Thanks for sharing!

  9. Cherie:
    on April 9, 2013 at 2:12 pm said:

    This sounds very interesting! Will have to read it soon.

  10. Charity:
    on April 10, 2013 at 6:45 am said:

    I love Carol Tuttle’s work. Glad to see she’s got something on kids right in time for the start of my parenting journey!

  11. Tobiann:
    on April 10, 2013 at 3:07 pm said:

    Very very interesting! Shared on Facebook and Pinterest for all my mommy friends to check out as well. I’m reading the 5 Love Languages right now. I’m going to have to check this out when I’m done. It’ll be interesting to see how they parallel each other, or not. :)

  12. Bek:
    on April 11, 2013 at 6:03 am said:

    Oh wow – so interesting! Would definitely love to read this book :)
    (shared on Facebook

  13. Alie:
    on April 11, 2013 at 9:09 pm said:

    This is amazing that it’s all in a book. I was just having a conversation with my mom the other week about how I have to parent my little Jack so differently than other moms do with their kids. He’s definitely a “type-2″, spot-on, which means sometimes he can actually be the hardest on himself. I have learned not to push him too much – he’s happiest just to be.

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  16. Jen:
    on June 10, 2013 at 9:24 am said:

    My boys are 1,3,and my step son is a 4.
    Learning The Child Whisperer concept has given me some great ways to connect more with my boys. Now I am working on using the concepts to help them connect more with each other.
    Thank you Carol!

  17. Allison:
    on November 5, 2013 at 3:05 am said:

    Wow! I have a 1, 2, and 3 in that order. The traditional “birth order” personality stereotypes do not fit my children. Will definitely read the book seeing that the synopsis mirrors my children’s personalities spot on.

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